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Dr. Chi-Sun Chan
Music Director & Conductor, Greater Boston Chinese Cultural Association

Understanding and Appreciating Chinese Music Through a Cultural and Aesthetic Perspective

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2016 at 7:00 PM

Music reflects the culture of an ethnicity. The music of China has thousands of years of history behind it, and in its modern form it influences the lives of a large part of the world’s people. Through recordings and discussion, Dr. Chan will help us appreciate and understand Chinese music and how it is affected by Chinese culture. He will also talk about the origin of some Chinese instruments as well as the differences between western and Chinese music in terms of musical concepts and ideas.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER: Dr. Chi-Sun Chan earned his DMA from Boston University and has lectured at Harvard University, Berklee College of Music, University of Kentucky, Lasell College, and Wheaton College. He is currently Music Director and Conductor of the Greater Boston Chinese Cultural Association and Chinese Music Ensemble, which has performed in Carnegie Hall, at numerous local cultural events, and in educational concerts throughout the region. In 2012, he founded the Boston Synchrony Chinese Percussion Ensemble, whose mission is to promote Chinese percussion music.

36 King Street, Littleton MA
TICKETS $10

Purchase tickets by phone at 978.486.9524 x116

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Dr. William Banfield
Faculty Member & Director of Africana Studies, Berklee College of Music; Composer, Author, Recording Artist

The Influence of Jazz and Popular Music on Contemporary Composers

TUESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2017 at 7:00 PM

According to acclaimed Harvard professor and historian Henry Louis Gates, "Bill Banfield is one of the most original voices on the scene today. He tunes us in to the conversation happening worldwide between the notes of contemporary musical culture." His talk will explore the places and periods of change across generations, from jazz to hip-hop, the Harlem Renaissance to Cuba, and how these popular music genres have influenced today’s composers.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER: Dr. William (Bill) Banfield is Professor of Africana Studies/ Music and Society and Director of Africana Studies programs at Berklee College of Music. He previously served as Endowed Chair Humanities/Fine Arts and Professor of Music/Director of American Cultural Studies/Jazz, Popular, and World Music Studies at the University of St. Thomas, MN. Dr. Banfield also held the post of Assistant Professor, African American Studies /Music at Indiana University, where he developed the Undine Smith Moore Collection of Scores and Manuscripts of Black Composers, a permanent archives collection at the University. A native Detroiter, Dr. Banfield received his B.M. from the New England Conservatory of Music, a Master of Theological Studies from Boston University, and a Doctor of Musical Arts in composition from the University of Michigan. His works have been commissioned, performed, and recorded by orchestras across the country, including; the National, Atlanta, Dallas, Detroit, New York, Richmond, Savannah, Indianapolis, Sacramento and San Diego symphonies.

36 King Street, Littleton MA
TICKETS $10

Purchase tickets by phone at 978.486.9524 x116

Buy Tickets Online

 

Dr. Samuel Mehr
Teaching Fellow, Harvard University

On the Origins of Music

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2017 at 7:00 PM

What is music? Where does it come from? How did it begin? How does it work?
"In my research" explains Dr. Mehr, "my collaborators and I address these questions with a variety of methods from cognitive science and evolutionary psychology. For instance, in behavioral experiments, we study how babies react to the songs they hear and to the people who sing them. In our Natural History of Song Project, we investigate the universality of music in over 100 indigenous cultures. In studies of people with rare genetic conditions, we test music's relation to parent-offspring conflict."

ABOUT THE SPEAKER: Dr. Samuel Mehr, a Harvard University teaching fellow, studies the origins and functions of music in the Laboratory for Developmental Studies and the Evolutionary Psychology Laboratory, both in Harvard's Department of Psychology. His advisors are Howard Gardner, Liz Spelke, Max Krasnow, and Steve Pinker. Dr. Mehr holds a Doctorate and Master of Education in Human Development & Education from Harvard University and received his B. M. in Music Education from Eastman School. Outside of academia you can hear him perform on reeds (including clarinet, flute, saxophone, bassoon, and oboe) at a variety of venues, including Boston’s Wang Theatre and Maine's Ogunquit Playhouse. He grew up in Cambridge and splits his time between there and Wellington, New Zealand, where he is a Visiting Scholar at Victoria University's School of Psychology.

36 King Street, Littleton MA
TICKETS $10

Purchase tickets by phone at 978.486.9524 x116

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Dr. Marisol Negrón
Assistant Professor of American Studies and Latino Studies, University of Massachusetts-Boston

West Side Story: Immigration and Music

TUESDAY, MARCH 14, 2017 at 7:00 PM

Professor Negrón will situate the music of West Side Story -- the 1957 American musical composed by Leonard Bernstein with lyrics by Stephen Sondheim -- in in the context of Puerto Rican migration to the United States during the 1950s. She will pay particular attention to the role of music in framing the relationship of the "Sharks" to 'Americaness' and how the film’s iconic rooftop performance of “America” enters into dialogue with broader narratives of national belonging.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER: Dr. Marisol Negrón is an Assistant Professor of American Studies and Latino Studies at UMASS-Boston. She is also an affiliated faculty of the Women's and Gender Studies Department and the graduate program in Transnational, Cultural, and Community Studies. A founding member of the New England Consortium of Latino Studies, Dr. Negrón holds a Ph.D. from Stanford University. Her research examines how cultural products transmit collective memories and social identities across generations of Latinos. She is particularly interested in the complex and contradictory ways that cultural products reanimate, circulate, and transform meanings of Latinidad vis a vis questions of space, gender and sexuality, race and ethnicity, language, immigration status, sound, medium, or other symbolic and material factors.

36 King Street, Littleton MA
TICKETS $10

Purchase tickets by phone at 978.486.9524 x116
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Dr. James Schmidt
Professor of History, Philosophy, and Political Science, Boston University

Vivaldi and the Enlightenment

TUESDAY, APRIL 11, 2017 at 7:00 PM

The sonnetto dimostrativo (illustrative sonnet) that accompanied the first edition of Vivaldi's Four Seasons lays out a program for listeners that speaks of chirping birds, raging thunderstorms, dancing peasants, faithful dogs, and buzzing flies. But while it is easy enough to understand how Vivaldi goes about imitating the sounds of birds or dogs, how can music represent the "calm and contentment by the fireside" or the oppressive heat of summer in the Veneto? Why is it that we routinely associate musical sounds with emotions like joy or sorrow? In short: what does it mean to say that music -- that most enigmatic of the arts -- means something? .

ABOUT THE SPEAKER: A Boston University faculty member since 1981, Dr. James Schmidt holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from MIT and a B.A. in Political Science from Rutgers University. He specializes in European intellectual history and the history of political and social thought from the eighteenth century to the present. Dr. Schmidt is the author of numerous publications, including Maurice Merleau-Ponty: Between Phenomenology and Structuralism (1985) and he was the editor of What is Enlightenment? Eighteenth-Century Answers and Twentieth-Century Questions (1996). A recipient of a number of grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, he received the James L. Clifford Prize from the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies and was a Fellow at the Liguria Center for the Arts and Humanities.

36 King Street, Littleton MA
TICKETS $10

Purchase tickets by phone at 978.486.9524 x116

Buy Tickets Online

 

 

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